3 Reasons Why Your Sales Calling Script Needs Improvement

November 5, 2014 Justin Proctor

3 Reasons Why Your Sales Calling Script Needs ImprovementYou only have so many people you can contact about buying your products and services, and if you waste precious contacts on a shoddy old sales calling script, you may not get another chance with them later. 

How do you know if your sales calling script is in need of an update? The following are three common problems with sales calling scripts. Once you identify and solve the problems, your sales reps will have a much easier time making appointments and closing sales. Let's look at these three common problems.

1. It Sounds Like a Script

How do you feel when someone talks to you from a script? It feels like they're not really talking to you. Instead, they're talking at you, and your first instinct is to make them stop.

This is not the best approach for a sales call, and yet, most sales people feel that they need a script of some sort to keep them focused on their talking points. You can improve your sales calling script by leaving portions of the script open for customization. In other words, your script can include the essentials but leave ad-lib room for items that are specific to the person you're talking to. The following items are good ones for customization:

  • A conversational opening
  • Details about the prospect's company
  • Industry-specific conversation

A sales calling script that doesn't sound scripted can be a major asset to your overall sales process.

2. It Doesn't Get Right to the Point

A sales calling script that requires the caller to drone on and on without getting to the point is sure to be a disaster. You should be able to raise curiosity, give context for your call, and explain what you can do to help within the first two or three sentences.

For instance, an effective sales script might begin as follows: "Hi, I'm _______________, and I'm calling local start-ups to find out if they're a good match for our products and services. We provide companies like yours with ____________________."

With a brief, right-to-the-point script like these, you won't turn off the people who are busy at the moment you happen to call, and you'll present yourself as congenial and professional.

3. It Needs Structure

In sales, first impressions can make or break you. If you present yourself as disorganized and unsure of yourself on the phone, prospects won't have a lot of faith in you. On the other hand, if your initial sales call is professional and well structured, you will have made a great first impression.

Look carefully at your current sales calling script to see if it has any coherent structure. A great sales calling script should include the following five components:

  • A quick and concise greeting
  • Your introduction (see the above section about getting right to the point)
  • An explanation of the benefits the prospect will receive by using your products and services
  • A request for an appointment
  • Your answers for any concerns or objections

When your sales calling script includes these items and is constructed in a thoughtful, orderly way, your sales reps will be well prepared to handle questions, objections, and any other variables that affect their sales calls.

If your current sales calling script sounds scripted, doesn't get right to the point, or needs structure, take the necessary actions to improve it. Such improvements will help your sales reps to take full advantage of each contact with prospects. A finely tuned sales calling script is an invaluable tool for your sales team.  The B2B Sales Essentials Assessment


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